online casino sverige

Review of: The Alchemist

Reviewed by:
Rating:
5
On 21.09.2020
Last modified:21.09.2020

Summary:

The Alchemist

The Alchemist: A Fable about Following Your Dream | Coelho, Paulo | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und Verkauf​. One day he finds the courage to follow his dreams into distant lands, each step galvanised by the knowledge that he is following the right path: his own. The. Der Alchimist. (German Edition) [Coelho, Paulo] on curlyhorses.nu *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Der Alchimist. (German Edition).

The Alchemist Spark Notes

Der Alchimist ist ein Roman des brasilianischen Schriftstellers Paulo Coelho. Er erschien unter dem Originaltitel „O Alquimista“. Die deutsche Erstausgabe erschien im Verlag Peter Erd. Der Roman verkaufte sich zwar gut, war aber lange. The Alchemist: A Fable about Following Your Dream | Coelho, Paulo | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und Verkauf​. The Alchemist (English Edition) eBook: Coelho, Paulo: curlyhorses.nu: Kindle-Shop. Der Alchimist ist ein Roman des brasilianischen Schriftstellers Paulo Coelho. Er erschien unter dem Originaltitel „O Alquimista“. Die deutsche Erstausgabe. Thalia: Infos zu Autor, Inhalt und Bewertungen ❤ Jetzt»The Alchemist«nach Hause oder Ihre Filiale vor Ort bestellen! Der Alchimist. (German Edition) [Coelho, Paulo] on curlyhorses.nu *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Der Alchimist. (German Edition). Der Alchimist [Coelho, Paulo] on curlyhorses.nu *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Der Alchimist.

The Alchemist

Der Alchimist. (German Edition) [Coelho, Paulo] on curlyhorses.nu *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Der Alchimist. (German Edition). THE ALCHEMIST von Paulo Coelho und eine große Auswahl ähnlicher Bücher, Kunst und Sammlerstücke erhältlich auf curlyhorses.nu One day he finds the courage to follow his dreams into distant lands, each step galvanised by the knowledge that he is following the right path: his own. The. The Alchemist The Alchemist Paulo Coelho. Get free delivery with The Best Apps For Ios Prime. Anmelden Konto anlegen. Gesamtpreis 1 Artikel Artikel : Versandziel:. Kurzbeschreibung Santiago, a young shepherd living in the hills of Andalucia, feels that there is more to life than his humble home and his flock. Amazon Rapids Fun stories for kids on the go. English Choose a language for shopping.

The Alchemist Studying, simplified. Video

CGI Animated Shorts : \ The Alchemist von Paulo Coelho Taschenbuch bei curlyhorses.nu bestellen. ✓ Bis zu 70% günstiger als Neuware ✓ Top Qualität ✓ Gratis Versand ab 10€. THE ALCHEMIST von Paulo Coelho und eine große Auswahl ähnlicher Bücher, Kunst und Sammlerstücke erhältlich auf curlyhorses.nu One day he finds the courage to follow his dreams into distant lands, each step galvanised by the knowledge that he is following the right path: his own. The. Hard Cover. Davon beeindruckt, lässt sie der Anführer der Krieger frei und sie setzen ihre Reise fort. In der Karawane lernt Santiago einen Kameltreiber kennen, der bei einem Erdbeben alles verloren hat. Zustand des Schutzumschlags: Very Online Casino Kostenlos Startguthaben. Beautiful story. Weitere Informationen Magic Book diesem Verkäufer Verkäufer kontaktieren 3. Im Jahre zeichnete der Bundesverband Musikindustrie das Hörspiel mit der Platinschallplatte für mehr als A moden classic. Slotmachines Free Edition. Von: Peter Harrington. Ohne Geld zeigt ihm der Alchimist, wie aus Blei Casino Bliesheim gemacht wird, danach trennen sie sich. War er Kostenlose Majong zufrieden mit seiner Existenz? Er lernt allerdings auch, dass er, bevor er seinen Schatz findet, immer wieder vor neue Prüfungen gestellt wird. Er reist zurück nach Andalusien, gräbt den Schatz aus und macht sich auf den Weg zu Fatima, um sie dann zu heiraten. Verlag: HarperOne Ansichten Lesen Bearbeiten Quelltext bearbeiten Versionsgeschichte. Ohne aktives Javascript kann es zu Problemen bei der Darstellung kommen. The Alchemist

The Alchemist More items to explore Video

The Alchemist \ Paulo Coelho, born in Rio de Janeiro inis one of the bestselling and most influential authors in the world. So why did it wind me up so much? Start your review of The Alchemist. Roc Marciano and Prodigy. It is all about finding your Personal Legend and pursuing your dream regardless of any hurdles, and about being spiritually connected to the universe, which is Free Online Dc Comic Books of us, and part Dolphin Online Multiplayer God. View all comments. Because the treasure is where there is heart. The Alchemist

Welcome to the journey :. Highly recommended. This gift edition is beautiful. It comes in a lovely 'box' holder with a ribbon cover over it.

It's the ideal gift set. See all reviews. Top reviews from other countries. This is probably the most intresting book I've read so far, the writing so the book is amazing and can be easily understand.

If you are first time reader then I would definitely recommend this book. It is was originally written in Portuguese and later translated in English.

The story is about a boy from Andalsuia and his adventures through African desert to find treasure in Pyramids of Egypt. One can easily relate with the story because we all have our own goals and this book will teach you that no matter how many obstacles come in your way you should never give up As per the quality of book goes, It's not that great, Pages are low quality.

But the texts are readable without getting strain in your eyes. So I can say the quality of book is okay I'm giving 4 star because of the low quality of the book.

I hope this review will help you in your buying decision. Its all about following your dream and about taking the risk of following your dreams, which is actually so difficult to do and there are very few people in this world who actually do, I mean risk it all, just to follow your heart and your dream.

Also, he talks about a stage in our journey towards realizing our dreams, where everything just goes haywire and there is everything working against us and it almost takes us to the brink of abandoning everything and just getting back to what was so familiar and comfortable.

This book is not for you if you are looking for a way to escape reality by immersing into a juicy plot during the week end. This book is about you, me and anyone and everyone.

It is about our life, our troubles and tribulations, our goals and the purpose of our existence. To determine our goal or Personal Legend as Coelho terms and to pursue and achieve it is not difficult if we are focused because in the words of Coelho," The boy embarks upon a journey in search of a treasure that he had dreamt of.

Each one of us are, infact, Santiago, unable to realise when and where we spilt 'the spoon of oil '. As you go through the book you learn that all is not lost and there is hope.

Narrated in a simple lucid manner,the story is interspersed with metaphors ,fables and allegories. Compelling, interesting and full of hope and positivity, The Alchemist is a bedrock of inspiration that instills a strong sense of faith in yourself.

Such is the power of this book that you will want to read it again and again. Paulo Coelho has an uncanny knack to soothe your soul and boost your morale.

This book, in my opinion, should be read by everyone, young and old, atleast once. So, people say this book has changed their lives.

I'm sure it has. If you don't believe in a benevolent higher power, this book just doesn't really work as anything other than a tale.

I suppose there are some general takeaways to be had, but I really disagree with the somewhat fatalistic aspects, which are often slightly contradictory.

This might set people on a very enthusiastic "wish and wait for what I want" path, or "go with the flow". Maybe I've completely missed the point, as I read it over the space of an evening.

I did highlight a couple of things in the book, which I often do, so I suppose there are some general insights that aren't directly related to certain beliefs.

I imaging this would resonate with people who believe in the "law of attraction" - e. However, if you are a non-materialistic critical thinker and atheist not necessarily nihilist , you may find some of this quite ridiculous.

The idea that if you want something, the whole universe will "conspire" to get it for you is nonsense. If I will the end of the universe, is that going to happen?

If I wish the opposite of what you wish, how will that conflict be resolved? Rating: 3 stars Category: Fantasy, Inspirational Synopsis: Santiago the shepherd boy has a recurring dream about a treasure awaiting him at the Pyramids of Egypt.

Leaving his flock and the life he knows behind, he sets out on an adventure to seek out this mysterious treasure.

However, the people he meets along the way will teach him lessons far more valuable than any wealth or riches.

The Alchemist is an inspirational tale about following your dreams. It was amazing to hear how the book has journeyed from selling only one copy in its first month to becoming the most translated book in the world!

Such a story of perseverance enhances the message of optimism and following your dreams. In the introduction, it is clear that Coelho has a very special way of viewing the world and I knew that I was going to be inspired.

Inspiration Everyone will find an inspirational message in The Alchemist that speaks to them on some level. For me, this was the fable told by the alchemist about a boy who goes on a pilgrimage to visit a wealthy man who knows the secret of happiness.

When he arrives, he is given a spoon with three drops of oil and tells him to walk around the palace grounds.

However, the boy is so intent on not spilling the oil that he does not enjoy the magnificent opulence and views of the palace. The secret of happiness is to see all the marvels of the world, and never to forget the drops of oil on the spoon.

However, as the book progressed I started to find the philosophical messages a little heavy-handed. Though beautifully written and poignant, they began to interfere with the flow of the story for me.

Plot I expected The Alchemist to be a bit obscure and an intellectually challenging read. In fact, I found reading it a relaxing experience.

Although it often waxes philosophical, the story is easy to follow and absorb. It gave me a warm, comforting feeling, so perhaps would be a wonderful read when in need of a bit of a pick-me-up.

I particularly liked the ending, which was unexpected yet satisfyingly complete. The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho Inspirational Quote Characters The variety of people Santiago meets on his quest makes the novel feel almost like a collection of stories coming together to form the whole.

There is a deep sadness in how Santiago meets so many people who have settled in unfulfilled lives and given up on their dreams. The Alchemist is a beautifully written story that has a timeless, mythical quality.

It is easy to see how it has captivated people around the world; the book would be a perfect companion for anyone looking to change their outlook on life and reach for their dreams.

Favourite quote: You will never be able to escape from your heart. So it is better to listen to what it has to say. Read if: you would like to be inspired to follow your dreams by an adventure story unlike any other.

Customers who viewed this item also viewed. Don Miguel Ruiz. Some of the greatest novels in history were published after receiving hundreds of rejections.

Thankfully, those authors never gave up. Everyone seems to have a clear idea of how other people should lead their lives, but none about his or her own.

Email Address. Day Planner Here are ten of the most popular passages and lessons to apply to your life: 1.

Filed Under: News , Stories. This masterwork is a legend and a precious treasure. View all 36 comments. John I was grateful to see your positive review amidst all the negative.

I'm glad you enjoyed it too. Aug 22, AM. Utter drivel. The book was badly written, righteous, condescending, preachy, and worst of all, the ending was morally questionable.

All the fables and stories are stolen from elsewhere, religious ideas and spirituality are badly mixed, and everything is so obvious.

The book harps on about tapping into the Soul of the World, the Language of the World, about your one true path and other nonsense. The basic idea is that if you really want something and "listen to your heart", the whole universe will Utter drivel.

The basic idea is that if you really want something and "listen to your heart", the whole universe will help you achieve it if you only look for omens.

A questionable idea in a world where people no longer want to work hard and achieve independently.

It reads like a really bad self-help book written for 8 year old children and disguised as a symbolic parable. I read a lot of books and I can safely say this is the worst book I have ever read.

It's only saving grace was that it was mercifully short. The problem with this book is not just that it's bad, which it certainly is, but that there are so many people out there who want to corner you at parties and tell you how it's totally changed their lives.

The profound lessons you'll learn from this book amount to nothing more than several variations on the theme of "only The problem with this book is not just that it's bad, which it certainly is, but that there are so many people out there who want to corner you at parties and tell you how it's totally changed their lives.

The profound lessons you'll learn from this book amount to nothing more than several variations on the theme of "only the very ugly is truly beautiful, only the very stupid are really intelligent, only black is white, only up is down" etc etc.

The writing is too simple to be really bad, but it's the content that gets you. By the end of the book you'll want to track down the philosopher's stone yourself and carefully beat Coelho to death with it.

I read this book about three years ago and just had to re-read it for book club. It was a steaming pile of crap then and, guess what?

The main reason I hate this book: it's trite inspirational literature dressed up as an adventure quest.

You go into it thinking that it's going to be about a boy's quest for treasure. If you read the back, there are words like "Pyramids," "Gypsy," "alchemist.

It's Hallmark Hall of Fame territory set in an exotic locale. Which pisses me off to no end as I normally try to dodge that sort of thing, but here it is masquerading as the type of book I normally like.

It's cliche, didactic, and poorly written. Just as with Aesop's Fables , there's a moral to the story. And Coelho keeps backing up and running over it just to make sure that we get it and he capitalizes important key words necessary to understanding it, lest we overlook their significance.

If there's one thing Paulo Coelho can do, it's flog a dead horse. Essentially, boy thinks he's happy in life.

He's a shepherd who gets to travel the world, has all of his needs met, and owns a book which he can always trade for another book when he goes to market.

What more can a boy need? Boy is then told by a mysterious stranger that he's not happy at all. Why not? He has failed to recognize his Personal Legend.

Everyone has a Personal Legend, which is life's plan for you. However, most of us give up on our Personal Legend in childhood.

If you are fortunate enough to hang onto and pursue your Personal Legend, then The Soul of the World will help you obtain it. All of nature conspires to bring you luck and good fortune so that you can fulfill your destiny, whether it's to be a shepherd on a quest for treasure at the pyramids, a butcher, a baker, a candlestick maker, or, one would assume, a prostitute, drug dealer, or porn star.

Hey, we're all fate's bitch in The Alchemist. But I digress. Boy seeks out his Personal Legend and finds it's a long, hard road to obtaining what you want in life.

But with faith, perseverance, and just a little goshdarnit good luck, the boy learns to speak the Language of the World and tap into The Soul of the World and fulfills his Personal Legend.

And what does he learn? That what he sought was back home, the place he started from. Oh, silly boy. So, in summation, here is what you should learn from The Alchemist : 1 Dream.

And, while you're at it, dream BIG 2 Follow your bliss 3 Don't be surprised if you find obstacles in your way, but you will overcome 4 It's good to travel and encounter people from other cultures 5 What we most often seek is right in front of us, but sometimes we have to leave home to realize it To all of these important life lessons, I can only say, "Well, no shit, Sherlock.

Alas, it's still crap. Cross posted at This Insignificant Cinder View all 58 comments. View all 18 comments.

It's the possibility of having a dream come true that makes life interesting. But, I understand why people are so passionate in their dislike of this work.

Paul Coelho looks to inspire passion in people with The Alchemist. The Alchemist is a novel that combines an atmosphere of medieval mysticism with the voice of the desert -- dreams, symbols, signs, and adventure follow Santiago and the reader like echoes of ancient wise voices.

With this symbolic novel Coelho states that we should not avoid our destinies, and urges people to follow their dreams, because to find our "Personal Myth" and our mission on Earth is the way to find God, meaning happiness, fulfillment, and the ultimate purpose of creation.

The novel tells the tale of Santiago, a boy who has a dream and the courage to follow it. After listening to "the signs" the boy ventures in his personal, journey of exploration and self-discovery, searching for a hidden treasure located near the pyramids in Egypt.

In his journey, Santiago sees the greatness of the world, and meets all kinds of exciting people like kings and alchemists.

However, by the end of the novel, he discovers that "treasure lies where your heart belongs", and that the treasure was the journey itself, the discoveries he made, and the wisdom he acquired.

As the alchemist himself says when he appears to Santiago in the form of an old king "when you really want something to happen, the whole universe conspires so that your wish comes true".

This is the core of the novel's theme. Isn't it true that all of us want to believe the old king when he says that the greatest lie in the world is that at some point we lose the ability to control our lives, and become the pawns of fate.

Fear, fear of failure seems to be the greatest obstacle to happiness. This is where Coelho really captures the drama of man, who sacrifices fulfillment to conformity, who knows he can achieve greatness but denies doing so, and ends up living an empty shell of a life.

The Alchemist is a novel that will not appeal to everybody. Not everyone will identify with Santiago. We all have dreams, and are praying for somebody to tell us they can come true.

The novel skillfully combines words of wisdom, philosophy, and simplicity of meaning and language, and this is what makes it so enchanting.

View all 30 comments. Simon Robs A simple tale, heroic in character, told in simple language, and maybe that's the rub; it ain't literary enough to grab the high flown readers' might.

May 21, AM. I loved it and was enchanted by it throughout 19 hours, 20 min ago. His quest will lead him to riches far different—and far more satisfying—than he ever imagined.

Santiago's journey teaches us about the essential wisdom of listening to our hearts, of recognizing opportunity and learning to read the omens strewn along life's path, and, most importantly, to follow our dreams.

Its all about following your dream and about taking the risk of following your dreams, which is actually so difficult to do and there are very few people in this world who actually do, I mean risk it all, just to follow your heart and your dream.

Also, he talks about a stage in our journey towards realizing our dreams, where everything just goes haywire and there is everything working against us and it almost takes us to the brink of abandoning everything and just getting back to what was so familiar and comfortable i.

The example given was really great and yes nothing new but we forget simple things in our life like "the darkest hour of the night is just before the dawn".

It is actually true that so many of us just leave the struggle when it gets really tough and the chips are really low, whereas actually we were so close to the objective, if only we would have had a little more patience we would have been there.

In one of the episodes he talks about death, yes the fact we always forget, the only reality about our life, it is a constant which is not going to change rest everything is uncertain.

Yes, and those who do think about death, mostly fear it, some fear death because of the physical pain attached to it such people actually fear the pain rather than the death, I am one of them and there are some who think they do not want to die because its not time yet for them to go.

Ironically but true, this decision about timings has thankfully not been left to us. So, how do we get over the fear of death or make it our friend, a companion?

And not waste our beautiful life worrying about dying all the time. One of the possible solutions lies in this book, it reads "if i have to fight, it will be just as good a day to die as any other".

Yes very much right, one would never know when he or she wakes up in the morning that if it was the last day of his or her life and in fact, that day would not be any different from all the other days already spent.

So, why not take everyday as the last day of our lives and live it up. Here, everyday can be the last day of my life, every meal can be my last, every call to my wife can be the last time I would hear her sweet and loving voice and the kids… Anyways, so what I personally follow is, everyday when I wake up or every time when I move out on an operation, I say to myself "what a beautiful day to die" and there on, I just do what I have to and what I have been taught in all these years in the army and go through all the motions and concentrate on the job at hand rather than worrying about my death and I am really at peace with the fear of death.

Another beautiful thought which I came across about death was in the novel by the author called "Confessions of a pilgrim". I derived from it that death can be visualized as a beautiful person who is always sitting besides us, so close to us that it travels with us wherever we go and it also accompanies us to our bed.

Its a beautiful companion, a faithful companion, the only one who will never be unfaithful to us, rest all the companions are just lesser mortals and have been unfaithful at one point or other.

As per the Indian mythology, the soul never dies, it is indestructible, it only changes a body just like we change clothes.

Our soul is a part of God and it goes back to him. I firmly believe that there is no fiction involved in this story of the shepherd, but this is a true expression of mysteries and realities of our life, which we never pause to discover.

There is message that this book wants to convey to us!!! I have never been into writing anything ever in my life, yes not even a personal dairy, but since the time I actually started writing which was just a month back, I realized that if we just write our thoughts as they occur, the resultant has a touch of mystery, because what we wrote with all our heart and soul, sometimes tends to surprise us.

We tend to learn from what we ourselves wrote. It may sound crazy, may be the book has a effect that may appear really crazy but I am sure there are some people who would identify with me.

View all 32 comments. This is either a beautifully written and fable-like illustration of simple and universal truths or a load of crap.

Similarly, the Credence Clearwater Revival song Looking Out My Backdo This is either a beautifully written and fable-like illustration of simple and universal truths or a load of crap.

Similarly, the Credence Clearwater Revival song Looking Out My Backdoor, a clunky but loveable country western tune, was actually begun as a facetious parody of slide guitar yokel lyricism.

Was it really so bad it was funny? If it was so obviously corny and insincere, was that not funny? Or was it? Was he really wrestling women and then getting beaten up by Jerry Lawler?

That was a joke right? Now … think about it for a second. Was Coelho telling this straight or pulling our leg?

I have to say that I doubt it, but I did laugh a few times and the over the top syrupy delivery made me wonder, and maybe I liked it better considering this twinkle of a third possibility.

I will say that this could go either way. I can absolutely see where someone could find hidden treasure and deeply meaningful messages in the short novel.

And I can see someone rolling their eyes and sticking their finger down their throat in a gag gesture. View all 59 comments. Preachy, pretentious, and awful portrayal of women.

View all 27 comments. If books were pills, Alchemist would be a sugarcoated placebo with no real effect. Let's call it a feel-good homily. I have never read a book as meretricious as this one.

Many reviewers have pointed out the problems with this 'celebrated' novel so I'd rather not expend any more words.

Suffice it so say that this is a good example of portentous writing that is best avoided if your benchmark is quality literature. Shelves: books-read-in Timing is everything.

It deals in big, bold pronouncements of 'follow your dreams' et cetera et cetera, and it certainly makes you think about your own life and the pursuit of your own "Personal Legend" if you will.

But maybe I'm older and more cynical now, or maybe it's not cynicism so much as just seeing a reality that isn't so mystical and black and white as Paulo Coelho's, but in any event, I just wasn't buying what Timing is everything.

But maybe I'm older and more cynical now, or maybe it's not cynicism so much as just seeing a reality that isn't so mystical and black and white as Paulo Coelho's, but in any event, I just wasn't buying what ' The Alchemist ' was selling.

It's a good, quick read, I'll give it that. I enjoyed myself, and I definitely thought a little bit about my own life in the process, which I appreciate from my literature.

And while I was more or less with it for a while, I just couldn't stay on board with an ending that left me saying, "that's it? The whole book Santiago is in pursuit of his "Personal Legend", which he is told is a great treasure found in the pyramids of Egypt.

Along the way he befriends many people and makes a great sum of money, while also meeting a beautiful young woman who agrees to more or less be his life-partner, Romeo and Juliet -style which is stupid in and of itself, but more on that later.

It is at this point that he determines he has achieved a greater treasure than any he had ever dreamed of, and would go no further.

Cue the music and themes of recognizing treasure in all its forms. Santiago has a wonderful, fulfilling life laid out before him, and would most likely die a happy man by the side of his lovely wife and adoring children, all while living comfortably as village counselor of a beautiful desert oasis.

Sounds pretty nice, no? Well, that's where the book lost it's footing. Santiago is urged, coerced even, into continuing to follow his "Personal Legend", leaving behind his "love" who, it should be mentioned is a "woman of the desert" and so is completely fine being abandoned by her "love" and will simply wait and wait and wait for him, whether he ever returns or not traversing the desert and bizarrely evading a hostile army along the way by turning himself into the wind it makes about as much sense as it sounds.

In the end though, Coelho reveals to us that Santiago does, indeed, reach his "Personal Legend" in a two and a half page epilogue, where it is shoddily revealed that Santiago's long-sought after treasure is Buried treasure.

A box in the sand filled with gold coins and diamonds and jewelry and crowns, and all the other cliche treasure images you can think up. What the hell?

So what message are we supposed to take from this book then? Money is the most important thing in the world?

Women are objects meant to be seen and valued for their beauty, there to serve you and wait around forever while you go on wild goose chases across continents in search of money?

Obviously I'm being facetious, and Coelho intended to say that one should follow their dreams no matter what, even if it transcends a nice, content life, so long as you are in pursuit of a life that would be even greater than you can ever imagine, sacrificing what is good now for what can be great later.

But he did so in an extremely simplistic way, and the revelation of the Santiago's treasure being literally treasure was a major disappointment.

The thing was, despite his simplicity, the book had a nice message going for a while. If Fatima was Santiago's treasure, that I could have gotten behind, even if it shows a good deal of contempt for the role of women in relationships beauty being the most important factor in deciding on a mate, as Santiago is struck by her beauty and immediately professes his love; Fatima more or less acquiesces immediately and pledges herself to Santiago no matter what, even if he must travel the desert forever in selfish pursuit of his own dreams, with no regard for her , because that is something intangible that is meaningful and fulfilling, regardless of financial standing.

But then Coelho basically goes on to say that that is just a roadblock in the way of real achievement, and that one should selfishly pursue their own dreams with no regard for those closest to them.

How a book can go on and on talking about seeing the everyday symbols and omens in life and taking heed of them, presumably leaving metaphors for life all along the way, and then have what was presumably the biggest metaphor of them all, Santiago's treasure, turn out not to be a metaphor at all, but just money?

To me, that summed up everything. I suppose Coelho realizes this, as he begins the book with a brief fable about Narcissus falling into the river because he loved staring at his reflection, and the river's disappointment in this, as the river loved gazing into Narcissus's eyes and seeing the reflection of itself.

This is a horrible little story implying that everyone is obsessed only with themselves, a sad, empty little thought that Coelho spends pages endorsing wholeheartedly, under the guise of following your dreams.

I understand that other people love this book and find it inspiring, and I think I would have felt the same way years ago, when I was just out of college and it appeared I had my whole life ahead of me and a lifetime to live it.

I'm older now, and I've found someone who I consider to be a real treasure, and while I still have dreams, I'm not willing to sacrifice the happiness that this life brings me every day in a single-minded pursuit of something that I want for selfish reasons fame, fortune, etc.

If I was Santiago, I would have never left Fatima in the first place if she truly made me happy, as Santiago claimed she did.

Perhaps that makes me a coward in Coelho's eyes, not unlike the Crystal merchant from the story. But it'd also make me not the sad Englishman, whose single-minded pursuit of his "personal legend" had cost him all his money, friends, and family and left him alone in an oasis burning lead in a tent in the vain hopes it will turn to gold.

I guess what I'm trying to say in this long-winded review, is that this book is all about being selfish and doing what you think will make you happy, regardless of everything else.

I can see why that appeals to people, especially those who want to show the doubters and find their own treasure beneath a sycamore tree, but it's sad, in a way.

We live in a culture where everyone wants selfish things like fame or money or power, just to satisfy some gaping hole in their own souls, ignoring the real problems that lead to these compulsions in the first place.

To me, this book feeds and even encourages that misplaced ideal, and that's a shame. View all 17 comments. View all 90 comments. I once read a book that inspired me to change my whole attitude towards reading.

It was a medicine of universal, cosmic impact. Before, I had thought that books existed to enrich me, giving me knowledge, pleasure and understanding.

After reading the introductory pages of this "enchanting novel" however, I learned that more wisdom can be gained from the companionship of sheep than from books, as stated by the wise young protagonist, a shepherd who uses books for a pillow and sheep for dialogue partners it is a one-way road, with the sheep as teachers, for the sheep don't learn anything from him.

In simple, unsophisticated prose, which seems to be carefully following the rubric of a Grade 6 descriptive writing assignment, I read: "The only things that concerned the sheep were food and water.

As long as the boy knew how to find the best pastures in Andalusia, they would be his friends. Yes, their days were all the same, with the seemingly endless hours between sunrise and dusk; and they had never read a book in their young lives, and didn't understand when the boy told them about the sights of the cities.

They were content with just food and water, and, in exchange, they generously gave of their wool, their company, and - once in a while - their meat.

But I do have a question or two: If the sheep are only his"friends" as long as he brings them food, do they really count as friends?

The Alchemist
Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

3 Gedanken zu „The Alchemist

  1. Ich entschuldige mich, aber meiner Meinung nach lassen Sie den Fehler zu. Ich biete es an, zu besprechen. Schreiben Sie mir in PM, wir werden umgehen.

Schreibe einen Kommentar

Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Erforderliche Felder sind mit * markiert.

Nach oben scrollen